Epilepsy Foundation

Has anyone ever heard of "silent seizures?  I am trying to help a family put a plan into place for school (6 years old).  Her mother said she has silent seizures, but anything I have read only mentions the international categories for identifying types of seizures.  She has staring spells at school lasting less than 30 sec, no grand mal seizures for over 1 year.  Mom is trying to prove that these staring spells have had an effect on her academic performance, but if they are absence seizures, the data does not support that claim.  Help!  I am a school nurse and the family doctor is doing the necessary tests to help shed light as well.  Thank you!

Views: 2299

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Sounds like an Absence Seizure to me.  Previously called petit mal.

 

Remember, there have been over 100 types of seizures identified by the medical community.

 

SOME (not all) people that have absence seizures will look dazed, or daydreaming.  SOME may produce excess saliva.  Others will have repetitive motor actions.  "Absence seizure" is an umbrella term that groups distinctly different seizures into one general classification.

 

Epilepsy Foundation will do educational services on location for groups.  Check with your local Epilepsy Foundation office and see what you find out.

 

--Travis

Thank you.  I will contact them.

Pat

TravisEd said:

Sounds like an Absence Seizure to me.  Previously called petit mal.

 

Remember, there have been over 100 types of seizures identified by the medical community.

 

SOME (not all) people that have absence seizures will look dazed, or daydreaming.  SOME may produce excess saliva.  Others will have repetitive motor actions.  "Absence seizure" is an umbrella term that groups distinctly different seizures into one general classification.

 

Epilepsy Foundation will do educational services on location for groups.  Check with your local Epilepsy Foundation office and see what you find out.

 

--Travis

Silent Seizures are also known as absence seizures or petit mal seizures.  This link may be of interest to you:

http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/programs/schoolnurse/schoolnurse.cfm

 

M Thornton

The Epilepsy Foundation

The Epilepsy Resource Center

 

Silent seizures may also be referred to as absence seizures or petit mal seizures. These seizures are particularly difficult to detect because they are often mistaken for daydreaming or ADHD. While silent seizures are not usually dangerous, they can interrupt the learning process.

Features

Silent seizures are characterized by a brief lapse in awareness. These seizures begin and end suddenly and typically last just a few seconds. The affected child may appear to stare blankly and is not aware of what is going on in their environment. Sometimes the eyelids of facial muscles will jerk or twitch slightly during a silent seizure.

Time Frame

Children with silent seizures usually experience their first episode sometime between the age of 4 and 12 years old. According to Epilepsy.com, approximately 70 percent of children affected by silent seizures, outgrow them by the age of 18.

Identification

Silent seizures are quite difficult to identify because they occur so briefly that they may go unnoticed for months or even years. Children may have multiple absence seizures daily without knowing that they are occurring. Absence seizures may be misdiagnosed as ADHD; they can be properly diagnosed using an EEG.

Effects

Silent seizures may affect a child's ability to learn because of frequent interruptions during the child's school day. While having a seizure, the child is missing instruction and has many gaps in his learning.

Treatment

Medications can help to either eliminate or reduce the occurrence of absence seizures. Such medications may include Zarontine, Depakene and Lamictal.

http://www.ehow.com/facts_5627189_silent-seizures-children.html

Yep - I had these starting in college and didn't know what they were.  They usually lasted about 30 seconds to a minute or so.  For me they didn't happen very often and weren't that severe, I would usually come back to full attention in a couple minutes.  I never even knew I had epilepsy until a grand mal finally hit. 

 

They might be a different experience for a 6 year old but I imagine it's still distracting. 

 

Jon

Happy New year Patricia,

I've never heard of "silent seizures" before - from reading online about them, I'm wondering if they are actually called absence seizures? Which you refer to and say the data does not support them - are you talking about EEG's as being the data? 

I'm happy to hear that the doctor is doing the necessary test.  Please let us know what comes of these tests.

I have absence seizures and I can tell you that (depending on the frequency of them) I miss alot of important information. For example if I'm in a meeting - it feels like I've left the room multiple times and come back in the middle of the conversation.  Very frustrating because I cannot pick up what I've missed just by listening - it's like getting instructions on how to ride the bike but you didn't hear the most important step(s).  So I can see how it would effect academic performance. 

be blessed,

Kristine

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Terms of Service Update 6/4/2012

We have updated our Terms of Service for eCommunities Groups.

Events

August 2014
SMTWTFS
12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31

© 2014   Created by EF Admin.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service