Epilepsy Foundation

Hello, I've been researching on epilepsy assistance dogs and my mom and I are thinking about getting one, but we still haven't been able to find how much they cost and if they get along with other dogs. We have 3 other dogs. And I have 3 types of seizures, complex partial seizures, absence seizure, & rarely a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. also, how affective are they?

Thank You

~Ashley

Tags: Epilepsy, absence, assistance, complex, dog, epilepsy, generalized, partial, research, seizure, More…tonic-clonic

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My daughter is very interested in this as well, so if anyone has info, please let us know! Thanks for bringing it up Ashley.
-Louise
My husband has a seizure alert dog. She does an amazing job keeping him safe & I would urge anyone dealing with uncontrolled seizures that threaten their safety to seriously consider a seizure alert dog. We received ours from an organization in PA called Canine Partners for Life. Their website is: http://www.k94life.org/ They require a minimium donation of $1000 dollars (based on income) and you have to stay near Conchranville, Pa for a 3 week training. We found it very worthwhile. Their dogs are very well trained and they provide wonderful follow-up assisstance. Feel free to ask me any questions you may have.

Holly
thank you!! We live in Michigan also by the way if anyone knows of good Epilepsy assistance dog places near by we found a "Paws for Cause" place are they good?
Ashley,

The Paws with a Cause website states, "A dog can be trained to (among other things) push life-alerts, help and/or comfort a person during a seizure and get help or the phone for the client. Although we do not profess to train dogs to detect seizures, several of our Seizure Dogs have, after several years with a client, for reasons still not fully understood, developed the ability to alert their master of an oncoming seizure."

I guess the question is whether you want a seizure alert dog, who can predict a seizure beforehand so their person can get into a safe position, or simply a seizure assistance dog?

I found a website (http://www.epilepsy.com/articles/ar_1063676431) that listed some places to look to find seizure alert/seizure response dog organizations.

Holly



American Dog Trainers Network
Comprehensive state-by-state and worldwide listings of assistance dog organizations. A good place to start.

Assistance Dogs International (ADI)
This is a coalition of members representing organizations and individuals training and placing assistance dogs - including seizure-response dogs. Features legislative updates.
C/O PO Box 110
Shippack, PA 19474

The Delta Society's National Service Dog Center
Since 1977, The Delta Society has been a prime resource for information about the health benefits of animals and service animal/service dog issues.
580 Naches Avenue SW, Suite 101, Renton, WA 98055-2297
(425) 226-7357 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. PST, Monday-Friday)

International Association of Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP)
This site is a who's-who of the assistance dog field. It also features legal resources and conference information.
38691 Filly Drive Sterling Heights, MI 48310
(810) 826-3938

Paws With A Cause
Trains assistance dogs nationally for people with disabilities, including seizure dogs. Provides lifetime team support. Encourages independence.
4646 South Division, Wayland, MI 49348
616-877-PAWS 800-253-PAWS
Ashley~

Paws With A Cause is a WONDERFUL organization!
The process is long though so apply now if you are thinking about it.
My son just received his dog today. You can send a message to me if you have any questions.

COST: will depend on what type of organization you go through or if you train a dog privately. With Paws With A Cause, clients aren't required to pay a fee but can participate in helping raise funds if able. We raised all of our funds because we were hoping it would speed the process along. Also, I think it is important to take an active part in the raising the funds for such an important cause.

OTHER DOGS: again that will depend on which organization you go through. We have one other dog that is strictly an outside dog, and we have one cat. I do know with Paws With a Cause they say the other dog needs to be over 10 years old.

send me a message if you want to ask anything else.
peace~
Cindy




Ashley K said:
thank you!! We live in Michigan also by the way if anyone knows of good Epilepsy assistance dog places near by we found a "Paws for Cause" place are they good?
I have been living with epilepsy for over 20 years. I have had several dogs during this time. The best ones I have had when it comes to predicting seizures and comforting you after a seizure is, believe it or not, pitbull dogs. I currently have two females at the moment. They alert my wife before I have a problem and stay at my side the whole time.
I donot know how your seizures happen, mine happen in my sleep. The dogs will wine until my wife awakens. Then they will lay by the bed until everything is over and will not leave me. You can tell a good seizure dog when you go to pick them out. They will be the most affectionate ones in the litter. I have never had to have one trained. I do however awaken after having a seizure and have to wipe all the dog kisses off my face.
We also have a friend whose brother has seizures on a regular basis. The dogs have never missed a call. They start crowing his space and we know it's time to move him to a safe place. I am sure there are other breeds of dogs that do a fine job, but, I have found the breed for me. I wish you luck in your decision.
I train service and assistance dogs for childern and adults that have epilepsy and other disorders. The name of the organization is Step By Step Assistance Dogs 346 W. Washington St.
Dunkirk, In. 47336 near Muncie, In. phone 765-716-4319
That is exactly what Step By Step Assistance Dogs does about covering the cost of the dogs training. There are two depoist one is with the application $10.00 non refundable and the other is the depoist to be sure you want the dog and that fee is non refundabale $250.00 total cost is $3,000.00 and the client raises the money for the dog.
Call 765-716-4319. I have a miltipurpose service dog and I train dogs
JJ

cmscribbles said:
Ashley~

Paws With A Cause is a WONDERFUL organization!
The process is long though so apply now if you are thinking about it.
My son just received his dog today. You can send a message to me if you have any questions.

COST: will depend on what type of organization you go through or if you train a dog privately. With Paws With A Cause, clients aren't required to pay a fee but can participate in helping raise funds if able. We raised all of our funds because we were hoping it would speed the process along. Also, I think it is important to take an active part in the raising the funds for such an important cause.

OTHER DOGS: again that will depend on which organization you go through. We have one other dog that is strictly an outside dog, and we have one cat. I do know with Paws With a Cause they say the other dog needs to be over 10 years old.

send me a message if you want to ask anything else.
peace~
Cindy




Ashley K said:
thank you!! We live in Michigan also by the way if anyone knows of good Epilepsy assistance dog places near by we found a "Paws for Cause" place are they good?
im interrested in one to but i found something that there like 20000 to 30000 dollars
I raise guide dogs for the blind, and have been around the block of reliability and certification with many an organization. the most reliable that I have found and talked to a trainer with is Canine Assistance Dogs. www.canineassistance.org. They place ALL dogs at no charge. The wait is 1-5 years, based on need only. I personally have talked with trainers at the school as well as trainers form other organizations and have found Canine Assistance Dogs to be very note- worthy.
omg they are great. i have a boxer who helps me. he has never had special training. what he does for me is i have learned how to read him. he starts to get very antsy and arritated before i have one so it lets me know to get sitting or laying down fast. i dont know how much they are i am sorry about that but yes if you can get one that would probley be the best thing. and what i know of them yes they get along with any body and everything. and the way most people deal with there dogs is if there is some one with you at home or you are just sitting somewhere that is there socializing time, so go ahead and let kids pet them and let them run around home with the other dogs , but when its time to work dont let knowbody pet touch them but you. and be ready for a lap dog cause most of them sleep on the bed with you. but if you are not married or got a boyfriend they are a dude magnet lol. if you want to know more i got alot more info for you just ask me
my fith puppy i trained for Guide Dogs for the Blind (i am currently raising my sixth) also was able to detect my seizures, as well as responding to them during. As i mentioned, she was being trained for Guide Dogs for the Blind, had absolutely no training in sz response. If I was sitting, she would basically put herself in my lap and move constantly- wouldn't settle down at all until i was on the gound. If if was walking she would place herself in front of me, and then proceed to whine and be antsy until i was on the ground again.

Firstly, it is ALWAYS important to ask the handler before approaching ANY type of service animals- both trainees and working!!! some of the things stated here usually depend on the handler. I do personally know blind individuals who feel that other people petting the dog is always too distracting for the dog. In their instance, if the person doesn't ask, they can't tell what the dog is reacting towards. In public (when working with my puppies in training) whether I allow someone to pet them or not really depends on the dog at that moment. If I have been working on one thing a lot and i feel that the interaction may distract the dog excessively, or if I cannot give the dog or people my attention at the time I will ask the person not to. However, part of socializing and being out in public is allowing the dogs to be friendly. In training I have encountered the stigma of "working dogs" as being mean now that they are "working". While it is rue that the dog needs to be focused on the handler, it does not mean that they can't ever interact with anyone else all day when i am out.

As for sleeping in your bed- that also is a personal preference. In the dogs' mind though, that is a sign of dominance. They know that the bed is your territory. If they can get up there, then they are one step higher in the pack. I am happy to share any more info or answer questions. just send me a pm.

Marie Kirsch said:
omg they are great. i have a boxer who helps me. he has never had special training. what he does for me is i have learned how to read him. he starts to get very antsy and irritated before i have one so it lets me know to get sitting or laying down fast. and what i know of them yes they get along with any body and everything. and the way most people deal with there dogs is if there is some one with you at home or you are just sitting somewhere that is there socializing time, so go ahead and let kids pet them and let them run around home with the other dogs , but when its time to work dont let know body pet touch them but you. and be ready for a lap dog cause most of them sleep on the bed with you. but if you are not married or got a boyfriend they are a dude magnet lol. if you want to know more i got a lot more info for you just ask me

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